What is E-Safety?


E-safety can cover a wide variety of issues and topics, sometimes more than you'd think!

Click here for our helpful glossary of terms - and what they mean.

Browse the glossary using this index

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A

Acceptable Use

When you use any information technology at college - from computers and laptops to mobile devices - you need to be aware that the College has an Acceptable Use policy which applies to all students and staff.

You can read about what is acceptable in the document above,  which can also be found on the Moodle E-Safety Page.

 

 


Adware

Adware is a form of Spyware that will display unwanted advertisements, usually as pop-ups, on a computer.

For more information about how to protect against adware, spyware and other unwanted problems, click here


Android

Smartphone operating system designed by Google, which uses apps to provide basic and additional functions for users.

To learn how to protect your Android phone from viruses and other issues, click here.


Apple

An American corporation famous for designing cutting edge consumer electronics, computer software and personal computers. It’s best known for its Mac computers, the iPod, iPad and the iPhone.

If you're an iPhone, iPad or iUser, then it's pretty important to know how to protect your devices, and the information stored on them.

For advice about protecting your Mac, click here.

For advice about protecting mobile data - stored on phones, tablets, iPods and more - click here


Apps

Apps or applications are small  computer programs designed to handle specific tasks - and mainly associated with mobile phones and tablets, and other mobile devices.

You can download a huge variety of different programs ranging from instant messengers to games and office tools. However it's important to check out exactly what you're downloading and what permissions you give apps to access your information.

Downloading simple security software and firewall apps to your phone or tablet can help filter out unwanted viruses or malware. For more information, click here


Ask FM

Social networking site where users ask each other questions. This can take place entirely anonymously. Answers can be given either by text or by video. You can answer any question in your feed, or be asked a specific question. It can be linked to your Facebook and Twitter accounts.

The site has been a factor in a number of tragic cyberbullying cases. Sexually aggressive, offensive or bullying material can be posted entirely unmoderated.


Auction Sites

Highly popular sites such as E-Bay where users can put items up for sale, via auction or instant purchase methods, and the highest bid wins. While this can be a positive experience, there are possible risks that what you're buying and whi you're buying from may not be legitimate. To find out more, click here


B

Backup

It's important to make and save a copy of any file or document type you're working on. As well as saving a copy to My Documents, your user area or your computer, it's advisable to save a copy to a USB stick, portable hard drive, or to a cloud drive or network. To find out more, click here


Banking

Accessing and managing bank accounts and your money online is one of the most popular uses of the Internet, transforming banking into an easier, more controllable activity.

It's vital to protect your personal details and passwords from criminals and fraudsters who can steal your identity and more.

To find out more about how to use online banking safely, click here


Bebo

The once popular social networking site which claimed to be a more creative alternative to its rivals, where users could dramatically alter and create the look of their pages with skins, blog posts, whiteboard drawings etc. Now a new version of the site is being designed and relaunched.

When using a social network, it's important to consider what you're sharing and who you're sharing it with. To find out more, click here


Bitcoins

Bitcoins are a virtual or digital currency that can be used as a form of online payment. Created, traded and used entirely on the Internet, the system is managed by a software algorithm and can be used internationally.

However, the scheme has already been expolited by hackers, and there are doubts about how stable or lasting the scheme will be.


Blogging

A blog is an online journal, which is updated frequently or daily with posts that can be about any topic. They can be created by anyone, from large companies and websites, to small groups and individuals.

They are informal written pieces, sometimes containing multimedia content, and can contain personal opinion, feelings and views. They also generally allow readers and other bloggers to respond or reply to the post, in an open stream where conversations take place between the blogger and other commentators.

Blogging can be a great way to establish a positive digital identity, to promote your work and your skills, and even make money and network with other professionals in your field of expertise. However, you also need to be mindful of what information you're sharing, and how you're representing yourself.
 Bloggers can also attract negative individuals who write derogatory, hateful comments (for more on this, please see the Cyberbullying and Trolling entries).

To discover the basics of starting and writing a blog, please click here

To find out more about blogging safely, please click here


Botnet

This term describes a group of otherwise unrelated PC's which have all been infected by the same virus, which allows them to be centrally controlled and manipulated by criminals or hackers for their own purposes.

To find out more about securing your PC or device from viruses, please click here


Buying Tickets Online

Buying tickets for entertainment and sporting events, festivals, gigs and shows online can be a fantastic way to beat the queues and get a number of tickets at the same time. Official websites often become overwhelmed with traffic - the number of people trying to buy tickets at the same time - and secondary sites offering tickets straight from the venue, sometimes at a cheaper price, can be tempting.

However, one in ten people in the Uk have been victims of online tickeing scams - here's how to make sure this doesn't include you. Click here for more information.


C

Catfish

A catfish is someone who assumes a false identity in order to pursue an online relationship. The term comes from the 2010 film about a man who believes he is in a relationship with a young woman but discovers he is being hoaxed. A catfish may have many attractive pictures on their profile and accounts on popular social networking and deating sites. They aim to start an online relationship with someone that can be very intense and seem very personal, and in some cases can lead to identity theft, fraud and other scams.

For more information, please click here


CEOP

The Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre, which works to identify threats to children and young people - particularly involving sexual exploitation, grooming and abuse - and to act in order to stop and prosecute offenders.

You can report any of these activities, whether you're experiencing them yourself or are worried about a friend, at the CEOP website, by clicking the eye icon in the top right hand corner of the website. To visit the website, click here


Charity Donations

It's extremely quick and easy to support a number of terrific charities and causes online, and a fantastic way to help many worthy appeals and campaigns.

Sadly, criminals and fraudsters realise they can exploit the kindness and generosity of people who donate to these causes, and are skilful at doing this online. To find out how to protect against this type of scam, please click here


Clickjacking

Clickjacking is where malicious coding is hidden beneath apparently legitimate buttons or icons, or under any clickable content on a website. This can happen on a legitimate website that's been hacked, or on a spoof version of a popular site, which users are tricked into using via links or emails.

The scam can take place on numerous browsers and uses varying techniques. It can be common on Facebook, especially when clicking to view video or picture content, and this can enable your account to be accessed - with false status updates and spam links being posted and your details stolen.

To find out more about online security, click here


Cloud

Cloud computing is where software, programs and applications you would normally install on a regular PC or office system are instead delivered via the Internet. It's also known as "hosted software" or "hosted applications." You can also use cloud computing to rent space in a data centre and use their servers. The most popular use of Cloud computing is to provide online drives to save content, which can be accessible via any device as long as it has an Internet connection.

To find out more about using Cloud drives, please click here


Copycat Websites

Copycat websites are those offering services that are usually provided by an official body - e.g. the government or local council - but which are not official or legitimate.

They usually charge a premium rate for the services and offer no benefit to the customer. They use SEO (search Engine Optimisation) techniques and various tricks so that they achieve higher positions on search engines, often ranking them higher than the official site and making themselves look authentic with similar copycat design, font, and so on.

To find out more about avoiding copycat websites, please click here


Copyright

Everything and anything posted on the Internet - whether text, images, multimedia and other forms of content - is and can be copyrighted.

Anything created or made by an individual is considered their rightful property, and this includes online content of any type or description. It doesn't have to be registered - as soon as it's produced, it is deemed as belonging to that person.

It can get really complex figuring out what you can and can't use, and it can get you into trouble if you use something you aren't allowed to as you can be fined - and the fines are unlimited in their amounts, meaning you could have to pay thousands and thousands of pounds for copying or reproducing copyrighted material without permission. Please click here to learn more.


Creative Commons

Creative Commons can be used to allow creators of various types of work and media to voluntarily share their work with others. Sites like Wiki use a creative commons licence to allow people to share and distribute work.

The author of the work can licence people under creative commons to use the work and the licence will state any conditions on using and sharing the work; for example, you may need to attribute the work. When you click on an image on a site like Wikipedia, if licenced under the creative commons licence it will tell you how you can use the work.

For more information about this, click here


Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying is any form of bullying which takes place online, through any device that connects to the Internet. It can take place via text message and email, over Instant Messenger, and through posts, tweets, hashtags and groups on any social networking sites - including Facebook, Twitter and Ask FM. It can take place on blogs and forums with trolls posting dergoatory comments, and during online gaming. It can consist of rumours, derogatory names, abusive comments, posting inappropriate and nasty pictures, fake profiles and identity theft - and even rape and death threats.

We can help you deal with cyberbullies here at college.

Visit our Student Support team, or speak to your tutor or a trusted lecturer/ member of staff. For help and support from the college, please click here

You can also report cyberbullying to the police on 101 (to report the incident to Avon and Somerset Police), or if you have received immediate threats to your safety, please phone 999.

For more information on cyberbullying, please click here

 

 

 


Cyberstalking

This is where an individual can be stalked and harassed via the Internet, in conjunction to or instead of real-life stalking. It is deeply upsetting and just as dangerous and threatening.

It is a reportable offence, and can be reported to the police - either online, or by calling 101.

If you have been threatened or feel you are at risk of immediate danger, call 999.

You can be cyberstalked by either strangers or people who are known to you - for example, ex-partners/ boyfriends/ girlfriends. They find information about you via your online profiles and identity - even sometimes intimate details about your personal life and your current location.

For more information on cyberstalking, please click here


D

Dating

Online dating works by joining a dating website or app, where you can create a profile, search other users for suitable matches (sometimes calculated in percentages based on similarities) and can message people you like. They are only for people aged 18 plus, and underage use is discouraged. Some dating services such as Match ask for a subscription fee; others, such as OK Cupid and Plenty of Fish, are free. There are also many apps such as Tinder and Grindr which focus on casual relationships.

Whilst these services offer a chance to meet new people, it’s important to be careful what information you share and to stay safe when talking to people you don’t know. Not everyone is who they say they are.

For more information about staying safe when online dating, click here

If you are experiencing online abuse or someone is behaving inappropriately, you can report this to the police at 101 (to report the incident to Avon and Somerset Police) or if you have received immediate threats to your safety, please phone 999. You can report any bad behaviour online, whether you’re suffering from it or are worried about a friend, at the CEOP website, by clicking the eye icon in the top right hand corner of the website. To visit the website, click here


Digital Citizenship

Digital citizenship is about how we conduct ourselves online, and how we respect and treat others within the digital (or online) community. It’s about the appropriate and responsible use of technology and digital tools when we speak to others online – on social media, or when commenting on posts on YouTube, Instagram or Reddit, or what we tweet or blog – and understanding the implications of our actions.

This interactive Storify article explores issues surrounding digital citizenship in more depth - click here

Yeovil College has a range of interactive resources, links and media to help you understand digital citizenship. Please click on the link in the Campus Drop Down Menu to visit our Digital Literacies pages.


Digital Identity

Your digital identity is your online image. It’s created from all your profiles, activity and posts online, and can include anything from “likes” on Facebook, tweets and comments on Twitter and social media, news articles and blog posts and even web logs of sites visited.

Your digital identity can be seen by absolutely anyone and everyone – so it’s important to control what they see, how you present yourself and what you share with the world. Click here to watch a Common Sense Media introduction to digital footprints.

Yeovil College has a range of interactive resources, links and media to help you shape your Digital Identity. Please click on the link in the Campus Drop Down menu to visit our Digital Literacies pages.


Digital Literacy

Digital literacy is how knowledgeable and confident you are with using and understanding the Internet. From different types of software and website, to showcasing your creativity, networking and blogging, it encompasses a wide range of skills, including researching effectively, understanding copyright and plagiarism issues, and behaving appropriately.

Yeovil College has a range of interactive resources, links and media to help you shape your Digital Identity. Please click on the link in the Campus Drop Down menu to visit our Digital Literacies pages.


Download

A download is any software, application, document, image or file type that you allow to be installed onto your device’s hard drive or saved in your device’s memory. This can include apps you download to your phone or tablet, files you are sent by e-mail, types of software you have accessed online (such as antivirus, media players or office packages), and images, media or PDFs you may open on webpages or on social networks.

When you choose to download something to your device, you need to be aware about possible security issues – whether it might contain a virus, or access personal data stored elsewhere – even popular apps such as Facebook often require access to your geolocation, your contacts list and permissions to add or amend commands.

This PC Advisor article introduces the essential security issues you need to understand - click here

For more information about online security, visit the E-Safety page on Moodle.


E

E-Bay

E Bay is one of the most popular online auction sites, where users can sell, bid for and buy items advertised. It can be a fantastic way to make money selling unwanted items, and can be used by individuals and small businesses. There are many detailed guides on the website outlining how to use its many features effectively, but it's also important to remember how to use auction sites safely.

Click here to read Get Safe Online's guide to bidding and selling safely.


E-Book

An electronic book is a publication produced in digital form. This normally consists of text, images, or both.

An e-book is readable on computers or other electronic devices including smartphones, tablets or e-readers.

Downloaded content can also sometimes carry a risk of transmitting viruses and spyware to your devices.

Click Here to find out more about safely downloading content.


E-Cards

Electronic greetings cards are a fun and popular way to send greetings and celebratory messages. There is a huge variety of e-cards available online, and it’s pretty important to check that the e-card you’re sending – or opening – only carries your message, and not nasty viruses or scams. Click here to find out more about e-cards


E-Mail

E-mail, or electronic mail, is simply a communication sent digitally, from your account to another. Designed to allow speedy private, or group, communications, you can set up an email address with an online Cloud provider such as Outlook or Google Gmail which is password protected – only you can access your emails.

They’re important to have for professional and academic communication – for example, when applying for jobs or university – and are particularly useful for sending files and attachments. However, they can be easily targeted by hackers, and can be a way for criminals to steal your identity. Email accounts are also used to carry out scams and spread viruses and a whole bunch of malware, so it’s important to only open emails from recognised senders and keep your account secure.

To find out more about using email safely, please click here

The Yeovil College e-safety page has a wide range of resources which can help you stay safe online. To find out more, go to the Digital Literacies link in the Campus Drop Down Menu on Moodle, and clickE-Safety.


E-Petitions

E-petitions are created online to encourage people to support a cause, for which a petition is being produced to formally give to the government. They require a certain number of signatures to be completed and for Parliament to action a debate regarding the issue, which means that e-petitions are widely promoted on social media and news websites to spread the word and gain support.

When signing an e-petition, or filling in any online form, it’s important to understand how your information will be used and where it might be displayed. You may also end up signing up for newsletters, membership schemes and various other offers, so it’s good to read the small print! 

Click here to find out more about protecting your privacy online.


F

Forum

An online forum is like a message board, where groups of individuals can have a conversation or discuss a topic, posting their views publicly for other users to read and reply. Forums are usually moderated, to prevent spam messages or trolling and abuse.

To find out more about forum netiquette, click here


G

Grooming

Grooming is where adults use fake online identities to befriend children, teenagers and young adults in order to gain their trust- so that they can approach them sexually.

This can be in a chat room, message board or forum, on social networking sites or through apps - even through computer games or consoles which allow public multiplayer interactions. Sometimes it can involve sexual or offensive chat, over text, messages or webcam. Sometimes, there may be a request to meet up in real life.

If you are experiencing online abuse or someone is behaving inappropriately - sending inappropriate images, asking too many personal questions, or asking to meet up -  you can report this to the police at 101 (to report the incident to Avon and Somerset Police) or if you have received immediate threats to your safety, please phone 999.

You can report any bad behaviour online, whether you’re suffering from it or are worried about a friend, at the CEOP website, by clicking the eye icon in the top right hand corner of the website. To visit the website, click here 


H

Hashtag

A hashtag is where a social media user creates their own search term for a topic and by using a hash (#) creates a hyperlink to a page which links all identically hashtagged content. This allows any user to search for content with this tag quickly, and to join in discussions.

Whilst it's great to join in with trending discussions and share your images and thoughts with others, it's important to consider what terms you're using and how they would look to an employer or university. Hashtags can make your content searchable, so think about who you want to see it. Tagging friends and family in photographs and links can also backfire, especially if they don't want to be publicly linked to that content.

To find out more about what affects your online reputation, click here


I

Identity Theft

Identity theft is where a hacker or cyber-criminals steal your personal details online and use them to commit fraud. They use information like your age, date of birth, location or addresses, to make a false identity. They then use this to open bank accounts, take out credit cards, order goods, take over your online accounts, apply for official documents and more. That's why it's really important to know how to keep your details safe online, and what to do if the worst happens to you.

If you've been affected by identity theft, click here to visit the Action Fraud official Police website. 


Infographic

An infographic is a digital poster which is created to give useful information in visual form (the clue’s in the name – information + graphic = infographic!) They can present complex and detailed information really quickly and simply, from statistics to concepts.

The way that an infographic is presented allows you to understand connections very quickly, so that instead of reading a dry report or looking at a spreadsheet at a list of numbers and figures, charts and information can be shown and understood. The use of colour and pictures makes it easy to instantly see patterns and significance too.

Infographics are excellent to use for assignments or presentations where a poster or visual materials need to be produced. There are some brilliant tools online which can help you build an infographic which can be published online in different places or that can be downloaded as a picture file and used in presentations, reports and more.


Instant Messaging/ IM

Instant messaging is a way of communicating in real time via the Internet, allowing you to chat online through either a social media website or a dedicated app, like Whatsapp or Facebook Messenger.

It can also be an instant way of sharing content - like photos, links and videos. Services like Skype also allow video and audio calls between users.However, if you're IM-ing someone you've never met, or know only online, it's a good idea to consider what you're sharing.

For information about using Instant Messaging, click here


M

Microblogging

Microblogging is where the blog format is used solely as a marketing promotion and customer service tool with constant directional updates.Sometimes these can be informative and useful, particularly if you're a regular customer.

However, it can try and persuade you to sign up to promotional deals by giving away your personal details. Hyperlinks and content when downloaded can carry viruses and spyware, particularly as microblogging formats can be easily copied by hackers and used to trick people into giving away data and details.

To find out more about spotting online scams, click here

 

 


MOOC

Massive Open Online Courses are a recent development in the educations sector. These open courses have been created for unlimited access via the internet. MOOCs incorporate a number of the traditional resource features of a course, including reading material, videos and assignments, as well as features such as online forums. The forum allows an online community for students and staff.

To find out more about MOOCs and online collaboration, explore our topic in the Digital Literacies section on Moodle - go to Campus in the Menu bar above to find it.


R

Retweet

A retweet is where another Twitter user reposts your tweet onto their news feed, so that any users following their account will see it. It’s a popular method of spreading information and media swiftly, and to promote other users and events.

It can be easy to tweet and retweet almost instantly, but it's always a good idea to stop for a moment and think about what you're retweeting. Some content might be hilarious or shocking to view, but do you really want it appearing in your feed and be linked to you? Retweeting hurtful or abuse comments can escalate cyberbullying, and get you into huge trouble. 

For more information about your online reputation and what affects it, click Here


S

SEO

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is all about making your website, blog, service or brand appear more prominent - i.e. to appear as early as possible, or achieve high ranking - in a search engine's general search results. The higher the web page appears on the list, and the more frequently it appears in search results, the higher the frequency of visitors it will receive.

SEO works by manipulating how search engines work to generate results, and the behaviour of users; for example what search terms they use, which search engines they might use, key words. Websites can then be edited and changed accordingly to allow them to appear more frequently and in a higher position. They can also be promoted to increase the number of backlinks or inbound links which will direct a user to the website. Results can be targeted by search type, location, media type, and more.

Sound complicated? It needn't be. You can use basic SEO techniques to improve and promote your digital identity, or to create a positive online presence.

To learn how, click Here


Sexting

Sexting is where someone shares an intimate image of themselves with someone else. It can also mean that that person has then shared that image again - online, or via mobile phone. The image can be sent by text, IM, social networks, apps like Snapchat or Whatsapp, etc. Once an image is posted, or sent, you lose control of where it might end up and who might see it.

You can find out more about how to deal with sexting here on our E-Safety page. If you're suffering the consequences of sexting or sharing images, click here for the Safer Internet Centre's guide on how to handle it.


Skype

Skype is a free instant messenger service which allows real time voice and image communication; it lets you talk to other users either by phone or by real time webcam conversation.

However, it's a good idea to consider what you're sharing - once it's out there, it can be copied and shared - particularly images or video. 

For more information about using Skype safely, click here


Social Media

Social media describes the social creation, interaction and communication of both ideas and content via online communities and networks. These can be created through dedicated sites such as Facebook and Twitter, or through blogs and forums.

Social media can create a fantastic online community, enrich your digital identity and become an enjoyable part of your online life.

However, it's a really good idea to check what you post, what others can see and to find out how to deal with nasty comments and behavior.

Click here to visit our dedicated Social Networking page, and to find out more.

 


Social Networking

Social networking, or social networks, is what we call sites like Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Reddit, and so on.

Each user has their own profile page or identity and can link to other users, their pages and their content - think videos, music, pictures, blog entries, forum discussions, notes... Anyone who you're linked to can see your stuff, and vice versa. All this information together creates a newsfeed - a unique home page where you can scroll down to see what everyone else you've linked to (your "network") is doing.

Of course, different social networks might create or display content in different ways. Some, like Facebook, focus more on connecting with people you know. Others, like Reddit, encourage online communities and work more like forums. It's a good idea to find out how each social network works - how to fix your privacy settings, how to report or block other users, and also how to get along with everyone else!

Find out more about different social networks and how to make them work for you here.


T

Tablet

Short for tablet computer, these items contain all the features and functions in one single device. Traditional tablets incorporate touch screen movement and keyboard, neglecting the need for a physical keyboard and mouse. Tablets tend to be thin, and light in weight, as opposed to laptops; promoting their use as an everyday mobile internet browsing tool.

You need to protect your tablet and any data stored on it just as you would a regular PC or laptop. Click Here to find out more.


Tagging

A tag is where someone links your name with online content. This could be a photo you appear in, or a video or link, or even a comment on a page. When your name is attached to it, you get a notification or message to say you've been tagged - and you can then view that content. It can appear on your profile, on your news feed - and can sometimes even turn up in search results.

However, while tagging can be great for sharing good stuff and staying connected, if you're tagged in something slightly dodgy or embarrassing, it can be difficult to remove - and lots of people may see it who you'd rather didn't. Like your employer, your family, complete strangers...

If in doubt, it's best to ask before you tag someone, and you can also set your privacy settings on social networks to prevent others tagging you, or choose whether a tagged item appears on your profile.

This short video demonstrates why tagging without permission isn't such a great idea - click here. You can also visit our dedicated page to check out how to set privacy and security settings for many social networks here


Tags

A tag is where someone links your name with online content. This could be a photo you appear in, or a video or link, or even a comment on a page. When your name is attached to it, you get a notification or message to say you've been tagged - and you can then view that content. It can appear on your profile, on your news feed - and can sometimes even turn up in search results.

However, while tagging can be great for sharing good stuff and staying connected, if you're tagged in something slightly dodgy or embarrassing, it can be difficult to remove - and lots of people may see it who you'd rather didn't. Like your employer, your family, complete strangers...

If in doubt, it's best to ask before you tag someone, and you can also set your privacy settings on social networks to prevent others tagging you, or choose whether a tagged item appears on your profile.

This short video demonstrates why tagging without permission isn't such a great idea - click here. You can also visit our dedicated page to check out how to set privacy and security settings for many social networks here.


Traffic

Traffic is the number of users that navigate the internet, or a specific area of the web such as webpage or blog. A number of social media sites allow users to track the amount of the traffic that goes through their page via use of statistical analysis.


Tweet

A tweet is the 140 character comment or message that users can post on Twitter. It can be easy to tweet and retweet almost instantly, but it's always a good idea to stop for a moment and think about what you're tweeting.

Twitter can be great for networking, following businesses and individuals that you like and admire, and taking part in discussions.A positive Twitter profile can be a fantastic addition to your online identity.

It's worth checking that what you tweet is appropriate. Tweeting hurtful or abuse comments can escalate cyberbullying, and get you into huge trouble. To find out more about creating a positive digital identity, click here. 


W

Wiki

A wiki is a collaborative web based information databases - simply put, it's an ever growing way for users and site members to create, organize and edit content themselves. Wikipedia is the obvious example - with other web based wikis popping up.

It may seem ridiculously easy to research online, when a Wikipedia entry pops up for whatever you type into a search engine - but hold fire before adding this into your work. A wiki’s information is normally not a good source for academic research as the content may not have necessarily have been edited by a professional. The writer(s) of the wiki themselves may have copied and pasted chunks of other people's work without crediting them (plagiarism), or may be writing from their own perspective - so views could be biased. And modern university software will require you to run all assignments and essays through plagiarism detecting programs before submission - so if you've borrowed heavily from Wikipedia or online sources you can't cite, this will be flagged up.

The Learning Centre has more information about copyright issues here and you can find out how to cite correctly on the Learning Resource Centre Moodle page.



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